Romans Chapter 11

In Romans Chapter 11, Paul describes a conflict that began with the early Christian church and is still at work today. This conflict is that of the theology of grace and how it relates to God’s relationship with both Jews and Gentiles who had converted to Christianity.

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Paul Encourages Unity

Along with explaining this conflict, Paul encourages harmony and humility between these two groups of believers. He used Scripture references to underscore his exhortations. In verses two through five, for example, Paul recounts the frustration expressed by Elijah who felt completely alone in his belief. God reassured Elijah that He had reserved a remnant of 7,000 Jews strictly on the basis of faith and not works.

Disappointment with the Jewish People

Paul began Romans Chapter 11 by reinforcing the fact that God has never stopped loving His chosen people, the Israelites (who were later referred to as the Jews). He still loved them despite the fact that they disappointed Him multiple times in the Old Testament.

The Gentiles in the Church at Rome were becoming haughty. They believed that they were the true followers of Christ. They felt disdain towards Jewish believers, their pride was preventing them from growing in their faith.

In the first 10 verses of Romans Chapter 11, Paul reminded the Gentiles in Rome that the Jews were God’s original chosen people. He reiterated to them that he was a Jew by birth as he was from the tribe of Benjamin.

Grafting of the Branches

In Romans Chapter 11, Paul illustrated God’s plan for the coexistence of Christian Jews and Gentiles by explaining how the two groups complement each other. He did this by comparing the Jews to an olive tree, with God being represented as the root of the tree. Some of the branches of the tree were broken off, symbolizing the chosen members of God’s family who rebelled and broke away from Him.

In order to preserve the growth of the tree and allow the fruit to continue to bloom, God grafted in wild olive shoots to gain nourishment from the root and produce the fruit that the original branches did not. Of course, the wild olive shoots represented the Gentiles. Paul stressed that it was the disobedience of each group that allowed the other group to obtain grace and mercy.

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Romans 11 (King James Version)

1 I say then, Hath God cast away his people? God forbid. For I also am an Israelite, of the seed of Abraham, of the tribe of Benjamin.

2 God hath not cast away his people which he foreknew. Wot ye not what the scripture saith of Elias? how he maketh intercession to God against Israel, saying,

3 Lord, they have killed thy prophets, and digged down thine altars; and I am left alone, and they seek my life.

4 But what saith the answer of God unto him? I have reserved to myself seven thousand men, who have not bowed the knee to the image of Baal.

5 Even so then at this present time also there is a remnant according to the election of grace.

6 And if by grace, then is it no more of works: otherwise grace is no more grace. But if it be of works, then is it no more grace: otherwise work is no more work.

7 What then? Israel hath not obtained that which he seeketh for; but the election hath obtained it, and the rest were blinded

8 (According as it is written, God hath given them the spirit of slumber, eyes that they should not see, and ears that they should not hear;) unto this day.

9 And David saith, Let their table be made a snare, and a trap, and a stumblingblock, and a recompence unto them:

10 Let their eyes be darkened, that they may not see, and bow down their back alway.

11 I say then, Have they stumbled that they should fall? God forbid: but rather through their fall salvation is come unto the Gentiles, for to provoke them to jealousy.

12 Now if the fall of them be the riches of the world, and the diminishing of them the riches of the Gentiles; how much more their fulness?

13 For I speak to you Gentiles, inasmuch as I am the apostle of the Gentiles, I magnify mine office:

14 If by any means I may provoke to emulation them which are my flesh, and might save some of them.

15 For if the casting away of them be the reconciling of the world, what shall the receiving of them be, but life from the dead?

16 For if the firstfruit be holy, the lump is also holy: and if the root be holy, so are the branches.

17 And if some of the branches be broken off, and thou, being a wild olive tree, wert graffed in among them, and with them partakest of the root and fatness of the olive tree;

18 Boast not against the branches. But if thou boast, thou bearest not the root, but the root thee.

19 Thou wilt say then, The branches were broken off, that I might be graffed in.

20 Well; because of unbelief they were broken off, and thou standest by faith. Be not highminded, but fear:

21 For if God spared not the natural branches, take heed lest he also spare not thee.

22 Behold therefore the goodness and severity of God: on them which fell, severity; but toward thee, goodness, if thou continue in his goodness: otherwise thou also shalt be cut off.

23 And they also, if they abide not still in unbelief, shall be graffed in: for God is able to graff them in again.

24 For if thou wert cut out of the olive tree which is wild by nature, and wert graffed contrary to nature into a good olive tree: how much more shall these, which be the natural branches, be graffed into their own olive tree?

25 For I would not, brethren, that ye should be ignorant of this mystery, lest ye should be wise in your own conceits; that blindness in part is happened to Israel, until the fulness of the Gentiles be come in.

26 And so all Israel shall be saved: as it is written, There shall come out of Sion the Deliverer, and shall turn away ungodliness from Jacob:

27 For this is my covenant unto them, when I shall take away their sins.

28 As concerning the gospel, they are enemies for your sakes: but as touching the election, they are beloved for the fathers’ sakes.

29 For the gifts and calling of God are without repentance.

30 For as ye in times past have not believed God, yet have now obtained mercy through their unbelief:

31 Even so have these also now not believed, that through your mercy they also may obtain mercy.

32 For God hath concluded them all in unbelief, that he might have mercy upon all.

33 O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! how unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out!

34 For who hath known the mind of the Lord? or who hath been his counsellor?

35 Or who hath first given to him, and it shall be recompensed unto him again?

36 For of him, and through him, and to him, are all things: to whom be glory for ever. Amen.

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